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Meet the Primates

 

PAWS' Galt sanctuary is home to four adult Capuchin monkeys. They include Groucho, Chico, and Zeppo - also known as the "Marx Brothers" - who live together in a large habitat with grass, climbing structures, and an adjoining heated den. Ella lives in an identical habitat next door, sharing one half of the den with the other three monkeys. 

 

Wild Capuchin monkeys can be found in Brazil and other parts of South America. They are considered by scientists to be the most intelligent of all New World primates, and are incredibly clever at cracking palm nuts and catching frogs. Slender and agile, these small monkeys spend most of their time in trees, actively foraging for food. Wild Capuchin lifespan is estimated to be 15-25 years, but in captivity they can live much longer.

 

Capuchin monkeys are intelligent, energetic, interactive, and inquisitive. In captivity, they are prone to escape, they bite, and can transmit a number of diseases to humans. In other words, they should never be kept as "pets." In fact, Capuchin monkeys are illegal to own as pets in California, and many other states.

 

Keeping captive primates both physically and mentally healthy requires dedication and hard work. PAWS keepers enjoy the challenge of creating new and exciting things to keep the monkeys' active minds and bodies busy. A variety of branches, platforms, logs, hammocks, ropes and swings are strategically placed throughout their habitats on which to climb and play. A nutritious diet composed of "monkey biscuits," fruits, vegetables, and occasional insects is distributed throughout the habitat to encourage them to forage. Treats are offered several times a day to keep these busy monkeys occupied.

 

In August 1996, a group of 50 monkeys were discovered living in filthy conditions in the basement of a private home in Iowa. Authorities removed the monkeys to temporary housing at the University of Iowa until appropriate homes could be found. PAWS' cofounder Pat Derby offered to provide a home for four of them and soon, Groucho, Chico, Zeppo, and Harpo were enjoying their new digs in Galt, in an enclosure specially designed by Ed Stewart for busy, arboreal monkeys. The rest of the monkeys went to accredited sanctuaries and zoos, where their special needs could be met and they would receive excellent care. Harpo passed away in 2000 from complications of pneumonia and liver failure. Groucho, Chico, and Zeppo are estimated to be 20 years old and are in good health.

 

Ella and Jacque, once kept as illegal "pets," came to PAWS from two separate confiscations in 1994. The two got along well, spending their days foraging through their grassy habitat for bugs and small bits of fruit, nuts, and vegetables hidden by PAWS keepers. Unfortunately, Jacque passed away in 2013 from sudden heart failure. Plans are underway to introduce Zeppo (female) to Ella, so they can share a habitat and provide each other close companionship. Although all of the Capuchins share a common den area and can see, hear and communicate with each other, physical introductions need to made gradually and carefully to make sure they get along.

 


$100 Annual Adoption*

 

ELLA (Capuchin, Cebus capucinus)

Ella, born in June of 1987, was purchased as a pet at an early age and was kept in the family washroom in a small cage. We found out about her and convinced her owners to surrender her. She arrived at PAWS in August of 1992.

Ella lives at our Galt Sanctuary.

 


$100 Annual Adoption*

 

 

 

ZEPPO (Capuchin, Cebus capucinus)

In December 1995, sheriff’s deputies in Johnson County, Iowa, seized 50 monkeys from the home of a woman in Shueyville after veterinarians and health officials ruled that the animals were malnourished and living in unsanitary conditions. Two of the monkeys died shortly after being removed from the home where, according to reports PAWS received at the time, the animals were living with little or no food or water, and in a gross accumulation of their own feces.

Thanks to the efforts of The Association of Sanctuaries, an organization that would later become the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS), PAWS, and others, new homes were found for all of the monkeys. Three Capuchins — Zeppo, Groucho and Chico — came to live at our Galt Sanctuary.

When they first arrived at PAWS in 1997, it was clear that the three tiny capuchins had not had an easy life. When we moved them into their spacious new enclosure — complete with trees to climb, branches to perch on, and ropes to swing from — they were intrepid and amazed. They approved the fresh, green grass with a mixture of wonder and glee and it was only a few hours before they were acting like “real” monkeys again. No more cowering or fear for these little ones. Infact, they were so full of fun and joy that PAWS co-founder, the late Pat Derby, named them the Marx Brothers. All these years later, they continue to bring us joy with their antics and games.

 

 


$100 Annual Adoption*

 

 

GROUCHO (Capuchin, Cebus capucinus)

In December 1995, sheriff’s deputies in Johnson County, Iowa, seized 50 monkeys from the home of a woman in Shueyville after veterinarians and health officials ruled that the animals were malnourished and living in unsanitary conditions. Two of the monkeys died shortly after being removed from the home where, according to reports PAWS received at the time, the animals were living with little or no food or water, and in a gross accumulation of their own feces.

Thanks to the efforts of The Association of Sanctuaries, an organization that would later become the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS), PAWS, and others, new homes were found for all of the monkeys. Three Capuchins — Zeppo, Groucho and Chico — came to live at our Galt Sanctuary.

When they first arrived at PAWS in 1997, it was clear that the three tiny capuchins had not had an easy life. When we moved them into their spacious new enclosure — complete with trees to climb, branches to perch on, and ropes to swing from — they were intrepid and amazed. They approved the fresh, green grass with a mixture of wonder and glee and it was only a few hours before they were acting like “real” monkeys again. No more cowering or fear for these little ones. Infact, they were so full of fun and joy that PAWS co-founder, the late Pat Derby, named them the Marx Brothers. All these years later, they continue to bring us joy with their antics and games.

 

 


$100 Annual Adoption*

 

 

CHICO (Capuchin, Cebus capucinus)

In December 1995, sheriff’s deputies in Johnson County, Iowa, seized 50 monkeys from the home of a woman in Shueyville after veterinarians and health officials ruled that the animals were malnourished and living in unsanitary conditions. Two of the monkeys died shortly after being removed from the home where, according to reports PAWS received at the time, the animals were living with little or no food or water, and in a gross accumulation of their own feces.

Thanks to the efforts of The Association of Sanctuaries, an organization that would later become the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS), PAWS, and others, new homes were found for all of the monkeys. Three Capuchins — Zeppo, Groucho and Chico — came to live at our Galt Sanctuary.

When they first arrived at PAWS in 1997, it was clear that the three tiny capuchins had not had an easy life. When we moved them into their spacious new enclosure — complete with trees to climb, branches to perch on, and ropes to swing from — they were intrepid and amazed. They approved the fresh, green grass with a mixture of wonder and glee and it was only a few hours before they were acting like “real” monkeys again. No more cowering or fear for these little ones. Infact, they were so full of fun and joy that PAWS co-founder, the late Pat Derby, named them the Marx Brothers. All these years later, they continue to bring us joy with their antics and games.

 

 

*PLEASE NOTE: Adoptions are symbolic only. The animal does not actually go home with you. Donations made via animal adoption are used for the care, feeding and maintenance of the animals.

 

PAWS
Performing Animal Welfare Society
PO Box 849, Galt, CA 95632

209/745-2606 office/sanctuary
209/745-1809 fax
info@pawsweb.org

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